Courgette crisis

Today I came downstairs to the kitchen to find a note from my husband (we communicate by note during the week!). It read: “Crisis! Courgette and broccoli shortage across Europe. Oh Noooo …!”

Courgette crisis note

A typical love note from my husband

Okay, so I could feel the sarcasm oozing off the page, as he’s not a huge fan of courgettes, or broccoli for that matter, despite my best efforts to force feed him both throughout the year, but it made me curious. Sure enough, those were the headlines. First Brexit, then Trump and now Courgette-gate. Yes, the UK is in the grip of a courgette shortage. Hold the front page!

Apparently, cold wet weather has affected crops in Spain and prices of the lovely veggies are soaring, along with peppers, tomatoes and broccoli. And shoppers appear to be panicking about it.

What a load of tosh

This total over-reaction is indicative of a widespread attitude about the availability of fresh produce, but I suppose it’s not surprising given the supermarkets’ obsession with stocking every possible vegetable in every month of the year. It’s no wonder people have lost track of what’s in season, and what’s not.

Courgette crisis

I had a glut of courgettes last August … because that’s when they were growing!

My rather condescending advice to anyone worrying about their inability to make courgetti right now, is not to stress about it and tuck into some carrots, cabbages or parsnips instead. They’ve probably been grown a little closer to home!

Tuck into your winter cabbages instead

Tuck into your winter cabbages instead

And as for my husband, who is undoubtedly hoping that this dearth of courgettes will last well into 2017, it’s not the good news story he thinks it is. I’m ordering my seeds this month, and I’ll be sure to stock up on courgettes!

 

 

A touch of frost

It’s been a chilly new year so far, with frequent frosts and even a sprinkling of snow. All in all, a bit of a shock to the system for this southern softie.

Frost-capped sedum

Frost-capped sedum

What is frost?

When temperatures outside start to plummet, water vapour in the atmosphere turns to liquid. This is called the ‘dew point’. When outside surfaces (car, shed roof, lawn, plants!) cool past the dew point, the liquid freezes and ice crystals form. That’s frost, and we’ve had plenty of it!

Past the dew point to form ice crystals

A sprinkling of ice crystals

15 minutes of icy green

Although it’s been a great excuse to hunker down inside and switch to couch potato mode, I have still ventured out most days, using my 15 minutes of green to survey the dormant jumble outside and plan how much better I can make the garden this year compared to last.

Of course, I’ve also been making sure the birds are well supplied with food and clean drinking water, keeping part of the pond free from ice, opening up my greenhouse and cold frames on drier sunnier days to keep the air flowing, and harvesting the last of my leeks.

Keep the birds well supplied with nuts and other goodies in cold weather

Keep the birds well supplied with nuts and other goodies in cold weather

Stay off the grass!

The problem is that I have to walk across the lawn to reach the bird tables, feeders and pond, and as we all know, walking on frosty lawns is BAD. Normally, individual blades of grass will bend underfoot and soon bounce back without damage, but when grass freezes it loses its elasticity and breaks, leaving unsightly footprints across the lawn until it gets growing again in the Spring.

Footprints in the snow – not good for the lawn!

Footprints in the snow – not good for the lawn!

So try to minimise your impact on your lawn on frosty mornings. Unfortunately, my lawn will just have to cope, as short of putting in paths across to the bird tables there is no way to avoid the damage. The good news is that it will grow back eventually, with no long-term damage.

The benefits of frost

I know we all curse the damage that late frosts can do to tender plants, but it does have its benefits too. A cold snap will improve the flavour of crops such as parsnips by turning starches into sugars, it will kill off pests and diseases, or at least stop them in their tracks for a while, and it will break down soil, improving the structure (particularly welcome for those of us with clay soil!).

And let’s face it, although it’s tempting to retreat indoors at this time of year, with the right number of layers in place there is nothing more invigorating than a walk outside in clear crystal air under a pale winter sky. So get out and enjoy the frost while it’s here.

Iced rosemary

Iced rosemary

Are you enjoying the frosty start to the year? Let me know!