Pansy makeover

Remember those winter-flowering pansies and violas you planted back in the autumn? They are probably looking a bit ragged right now. Mine certainly were. But give them a bit of TLC, and these hardy little plants are sure to reward you with a pretty flush of Spring blooms.

Winter-flowering violas are a splash of colour in Spring too

Winter-flowering violas provide a splash of colour in Spring too

I’ve just been giving mine a bit of a makeover. It’s the least I can do, after the exceptionally long spell of frost and snow they’ve just battled through.

My pansies were looking pretty ragged after the harsh winter we've just had

My pansies were looking pretty ragged after the harsh winter we’ve just had

To give your pansies a Spring makeover:

Cut off faded or curled-up blooms at the bottom of the flower stem, just above the first set of leaves

Cut off faded or curled-up blooms at the bottom of the flower stem, just above the first set of leaves

Cut off pansy seed heads

Remove any seed heads that are forming or have formed, cutting them off at the base of the stem

Feed your pansies in Spring

Feed your pansies with a sprinkling of Growmore fertiliser … and watch them flourish

Eventually, the heat of summer (we can but dream!) will stop them blooming, but until then, keep deadheading, watering and feeding your pansies and you won’t be disappointed.

Late fruit tree pruning

The clocks have gone forward and it’s officially Spring, but you’d never know it given the current weather, and neither does my apple or pear tree! Both are in bud but neither has produced any leaves yet, so I figured I could get away with some late ‘winter’ pruning this week.

Apple tree in winter bud

‘Winter’ apple tree – lots of buds but no leaves yet

Conventional wisdom advises pruning when the tree is dormant, between leaf fall and bud burst (late November to early March), so I’m pushing it a bit, but better to do it now than not at all.

5 simple rules for pruning fruit trees

If you’re not used to it, pruning can be a scary concept, especially when you start reading terms such as renewal pruning and spur bearers, so I’ve condensed it down to 5 easy-to-remember rules.

  1. Remove any dead, damaged or diseased branches.
  2. Remove any branches that are crossing or rubbing against each other.
  3. Remove any branches that are heading for the centre of the tree.
  4. Shorten the previous year’s growth on each main branch by about a third.
  5. Remove any young lateral branches that are causing overcrowding.
Remove any crossing or rubbing branches

Remove any crossing or rubbing branches

Use a sharp pruning saw or secateurs and cut just above a bud that is facing in the required direction (ideally you want your tree to keep branching outwards to avoid congestion in the middle).

Above all, prune the tree to the size and shape that fits your garden. It’s no good having a heavy cropping apple tree if it casts a shade over everything else you want to grow. I’ve had to hack a fair bit off my pear tree this year, as it was getting top heavy and leaning over the drive. I probably won’t get as many pears, but people will be able to walk to the front door!

Follow up with a good mulch and wait for that wonderful explosion of blossom. It’s coming …. honest!!

Hidden Hellebores

March may be filled with the sunny glow of the daffodil, but it has a loyal compatriot in the tough, cold-hardy Hellebore. These harbingers of Spring thrive side-by-side in the flower borders around my pond, and together with the early-evening song of a vociferous blackbird, they mark the turning of the season.

A perfect combo – hellebores and daffodils

A perfect combo – Hellebores and daffodils

Hellebores have a demure charm, with gently nodding heads that hide their true glory. But the blooms can become hidden among the large saw-toothed leathery leaves, which turn an unsightly crispy brown as they age. 

Remove old leaves from Hellebores to reveal the blooms

Old leaves on Hellebores turn brown and crispy as they age

Remove old leaves

So remove the old leaves now, if you haven’t done so already. This will give pollinators better access to the flower heads and reduce the likelihood of Hellebore leaf spot, a fungal disease that pock marks the flowers with black spots.

Hellebore leaf spot is caused by the fungus Microsphaeropsis hellebori

Hellebore leaf spot is caused by the fungus Microsphaeropsis hellebori

If, like me, you already have this problem on some of your plants, then the only solution is to remove and destroy all the infected leaves and blooms (there is no chemical solution). If you leave infected material around the plant, it will be a source of repeat infection next year.

So give your Hellebores a tidy up early in the season (it’s an easy #15greenmins job) and enjoy their magnificence.

The glory of Hellebores revealed

The glory of Hellebores revealed

Hellebores favour a humous-rich soil in shade or part-shade with good drainage, but I’ve found they flourish in full sun as well. With hundreds to choose from, including double blooms and freckled varieties, if you don’t have a Hellebore in your garden yet, get one! I guarantee you’ll be hooked.

15 minutes of white

When the Beast from the East met Storm Emma it was no fairytale. With huge swathes of the UK under red weather warnings (risk to life) and the Met Office urging us to keep ourselves safe from the onslaught of icy Siberian winds and heavy snow, the weather us Brits so like to talk about was suddenly worth talking about.

And down came the snow and covered all the garden

With my garden cocooned under a thick blanket of white stuff, my daily 15 minutes of green was a no go. Or was it? Actually, I still found plenty of things I could do in the garden for 15 minutes, even in the snow.

15-minute gardening in the snow

  • Feed the birds – in these conditions they need your help more than ever
  • Break the ice – if you have a pond (and fish), make sure it doesn’t freeze over completely
  • Brush heavy snow from evergreen trees and shrubs so they don’t break under the weight – stake up anything that’s already got damaged
  • Harvest the last of your winter veggies (I still had some Brussel sprouts to pick)
  • Tidy the shed
  • Take a walk around your garden and make plans for the year ahead

The good news is that temperatures are rising again and Spring is finally on its way.

If you’ve got any tips for gardening when it snows, let me know. They might come in useful next year if the Pest from the West arrives.